Course: ANTH 446: New Orleans and the Caribbean

Professor: Katherine Browne

Syllabus: Click here

Course Description:

This course is designed to acquaint students with the fascinating story of New Orleans, its relation to the Caribbean, and its significance to American culture historically as well as today. The story is complex and better known to European tourists and Caribbean islanders than to most Americans. New Orleans represents the convergence of French, Spanish, African, Native American, and Anglo American influences that have shaped a strongly distinctive regional culture known internationally for exceptionally good food and music, Mardi Gras, jazz funerals, and other colorful street life, European architecture, strong roots in Catholicism, and its continuing interest in practices of voodoo. Located at the mouth of the great Mississippi River, the city’s history as an international port and a hub for people and goods on the move is legendary. New Orleans has served as home to countless notable people, including pirate Jean Lafitte, musicians Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Harry Connick Jr, and Ellis and Wynton Marsalis, writers George W. Cable and Anne Rice, chefs Paul Prudhomme and Emeril Lagasse, and voodoo priestess Marie Laveau to name but a few.

We will explore what makes New Orleans different from British-colonized areas of the US and the Caribbean by focusing on the distinct missions and ethics of Latin as compared to Anglo-Saxon colonizers. We will study Creole languages, religions, identities, food, and economics that emerged as new forms of culture in the collision of African and European peoples. The legacies of these distinct histories also played out in realms of race, gender, family structure, national identity, and in the expressive arts—music, theatre, and literature. Finally, we will explore how New Orleans is adapting in the most devastating chapter of its history following Katrina.


Course: ANTH 581: The Culture of Disaster

Professor: Katherine Browne

Syllabus: Click here

Course Description:

Disasters are occurring with greater frequency and greater severity than ever before. The reasons for these global shifts relate in part to changing environmental conditions, but they also relate to entrenched social, economic and political inequalities that expose more and more people to higher levels of risk. This course is designed to introduce students to the way social scientists study disaster—how we define disaster, how we measure its impact on humans and the environment, and how we debate its causes and effects. The material for the course comes from multiple disciplines and perspectives, including anthropology, sociology, political ecology, political economy, history, psychology, nursing, and journalism.

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. analyze how disaster impacts are likely to be unevenly distributed
  2. apply key theories about disaster vulnerability and recovery
  3. recognize how research methods condition the insights of investigators
  4. analyze how the type of disaster can impact the nature and extent of recovery
  5. identify how the role of culture fits into the analysis of disaster recovery

Course: E 370: American Literature in Cultural Contexts

Professor: SueEllen Campbell

Syllabus: Click here

Course Description:

In this class, we’ll look at a wide variety of kinds of records and representations of the Dust Bowl: histories, documentary and fiction films, letters, government documents and archival materials, poetry, memoir, songs, photographs, novels, websites, and more. We’ll learn about what happened and why; what people experienced, what they felt, and how they remembered those experiences; what kinds of stories they told then and later about themselves; how these compare to the stories other people told about them. We’ll watch how literature emerges from and feeds back into rich contexts that are equally material/environmental and cultural. We’ll note the different ways the genre or type of “text” influences what gets said and emphasized. And we’ll consider what we can learn from these stories about our own future, which will almost certainly include more drought.


 

Course: ECON 240: Issues in Environmental Economics

Professor: Sammy Zahran

Syllabus: Click Here

Course Description: This course is an introduction to environmental issues from an economic perspective. Issues examined include: environmental valuation and risk assessment; property rights, externalities, and environmental problems; sustainable development; population growth; natural resource and environmental economics; common-pool resources; air pollution; climate change; water pollution; the economics of hazardous waste; and development economics, poverty and the environment.


Course: ECON 380a: Population Economics

Professor: Sammy Zahran

Syllabus: Click Here

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to population issues from an economic perspective. Population issues examined include: population growth and national accounts, the demographic transition, the economic determinants of mortality and morbidity risk, fertility choice, family planning, and economic empowerment of women, age structure and the demographic dividend, the economics of migration, family structure and intra- household allocation of resources, the urban transition and economic geography.


Course: GR 100: Introduction to Geography

Professor: Jason Sibold

Course Description:

Major geographic themes applied to selected regions; physical environment, human-land relationships, regional analysis.


Course: GR 410: Climate Change: Science, Policy, Consequences

Professor: Jason Sibold

Course Description:

Implications and consequences for earth systems including the cryosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.


Course: GR 420: Spatial Analysis with GIS

Professor: Jason Sibold

Course Description:

Theory, application of geographic information systems for spatial analysis; conceptual basis of GIS, nature and use of geographic data, case studies.


Course: JTC 650: Public Relations Management: Crisis, Emergencies, and Disasters

Professor: Kirk Hallahan

Syllabus: Click Here

Course Description: How organizations plan for, respond to, and recover from extraordinary events––and the public and leadership communications they employ.

Knowledge of effective crisis communication is a necessity for professional communicators, emergency managers, and others who must work collaboratively under unrelenting pressure to respond to disruptive organizational events, public safety emergencies, and natural and willful disasters.

JTC 650 will examine key elements of crisis communications from both conceptual and applied perspectives––beginning with the anticipation of crisis situations through their impact on society. The course is intended for graduate students in journalism, communication studies, natural resources, sociology, public administration, business, public health, engineering and human sciences, among others.


Course: JTC 681: Social Processes of Risk

Professor: Craig Trumbo

Syllabus: Click Here

Course Description:

In perhaps its simplest definition, risk can be seen as a tripartite concept: the probability of harm occurring due to some hazard. Yet any casual scan of the literature makes it immediately obvious that there are far more complicated processes involved. This seminar will explore those processes, the social processes of risk. These processes involve psychological mechanisms, social structures, cultural dynamics, and most centrally, communication. The manner in which these processes function to define the world today will be examined across four dominant and strongly interacting contextual domains: technology, health (public and individual), environment, and natural disasters. This seminar will provide students with a broad entry to this sprawling and cross-disciplinary literature, from seminal work that served to coalesce the study of risk perception and risk communication to the most current literature that is redefining this field and charting its future.

Many of the readings for the course are taken from significant compilations of the literature that have appeared at critical junctures in the development of social studies of risk, the balance are from the most current material appearing in book form or in leading journals. While readings center on material from the social sciences, the seminar approach will be amenable to graduate students from any discipline.


Course: PY516A: Public Health Practice-History

Professor: Lorann Stallones

Syllabus: Click here

Course Description:

This course will ground students with an understanding of the history and breadth of public health and the structure and process of public health practice. The course explores several definitions of public health, plus the currently recognized core government functions and essential public health services. The U.S. national health objectives are emphasized throughout. The history of U.S. public health and the structure and function of U.S. government health systems are studied. The political nature of public health and the necessity of community involvement in public health planning and implementation are explored.


Course: SOC 402-02: Capstone

Professor: Tara Shelley

Course Description:

Do you want to apply your sociological training to a real research project? Do you want to talk with the public about a controversial topic? If so, the Department of Sociology will offer a special service learning version of the Capstone Seminar, SOC 403-02 in collaboration with the Center for the Study of Crime and Justice (CSCJ) and the Center for Disaster and Risk Analysis (CDRA). In the last decade, Colorado has experienced an unprecedented boom in natural gas production-some communities have embraced natural gas extraction while others have passed moratoria to resist natural gas development and fracking. As part of the Capstone experience, students will collect survey data from Colorado citizens while also using a sociological lens to understand this complex and contentious issue from the vantage point of: environmental sociology, environmental justice, green criminology, community/place attachment, and the sociology of risk.

If you are interested in learning more about this hands on Capstone experience please contact Dr. Tara Shelley at tara.shelley@colostate.edu and attend an informational meeting on Thursday, April 3, at 5:00 (meet in Clark B252) or on Friday, April 11 at 3:00 (meet in Clark B252). This experience is NOT restricted to students in the environmental sociology or CCJ Concentration-all Sociology students are encouraged to participate in this unique experience.

You do need Dr. Shelley's permission to register for the class so please plan on attending one of the informational meetings.


Course: SOC 463: Sociology of Disaster

Professor: Jennifer Tobin-Gurley

Syllabus: Click here

Course Description:

Disasters can result from forces of nature such as wildfires, hurricanes, tornados, floods, earthquakes, and droughts; technological accidents such as nuclear reactor meltdowns, train derailments, oil spills, and chemical releases; willful acts of violence such as terrorism and shootings; or a combination of the above. Disasters can be slow to emerge, as is the case with drought, or can be sudden or unexpected such as when earthquakes or tornadoes strike. These events have the potential to disrupt community functioning, cause displacement, and result in significant economic and property loss, injuries, fatalities, and profound emotional suffering.

Disasters are occurring with greater frequency and greater severity than ever before. Between 1992 and 2012, disasters affected over 4.4 billion people, caused 1.3 million deaths, and resulted in over $2 trillion in economic losses (UNISDR 2012). In part, these global shifts are caused by changing environmental conditions, but they also occur due to entrenched social, economic and political inequalities that expose more and more people to higher levels of risk. This course is designed to introduce students to the sociological investigation of disasters—their origins, effects, and the social dynamics that create risk of and vulnerability to disasters.


Course: SOC 564: Environmental Justice

Professor: Tara Shelley

Syllabus: Click here

Course Description:

This course examines the unequal distributions of environmental risks, benefits, policies and regulatory practices across different populations. We will explore the meaning of social justice, environmental justice, environmental quality and environmental equity. We will also examine the history of the environmental justice movement and evidence of environmental injustices (i.e., toxic releases, treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, Superfund sites, etc.). Processes of social control in response to environmental harms and policies that address environmental inequities will be considered as well as political economic explanations of injustices (with a focus on production). To examine these topics, the course takes an interdisciplinary approach as environmental justice is a central area of concern for sociology, anthropology, ethnic studies, political science, public administration, public health, economics, criminology and criminal justice, and geography.